An analysis of the black deaths influence on medieval society

The arrival of this plague set the scene for years of strife and heroism. Leaving the social and economic aspect in a standstill.

An analysis of the black deaths influence on medieval society

Print this page The onset of the plague Contemporaries were horrified by the onset of the plague in the wet summer of Ralph Higden of Chester, the best known contemporary chronicler thought 'scarcely a tenth of mankind was left alive'.

His analysis of the scale of the mortality is repeated by other commentators. The phrase 'there were hardly enough living to care for the sick and bury the dead' is repeated in various sources including a chronicle compiled at St Mary's Abbey, York.

The Malmesbury monk, writing in Wiltshire, reckoned that 'over England as a whole a fifth of men, women and children were carried to the grave'. The plague did not abate in the Winter but became even more virulent in the early months of and continued into Chroniclers and administrators make numerous references to the extension of graveyards, for example in Bristol, and to the mass burial of bodies in pits.

At Rochester Kent men and women cast their dead children into communal graves 'from which arose such a stench that it was barely possible to go past a churchyard'.

Modern excavation of such pits in London, near The Tower on the site of former Royal Mint and in the cathedral close at Hereford, testify to these extreme measures. In London the pits took the form of long, narrow trenches with bodies laid in orderly rows: Today we have the benefit of hindsight.

An analysis of the black deaths influence on medieval society

We know, as fourteenth-century people suspected, that the mortality caused by the bubonic plague of the Black Death was the worst demographic disaster in the history of the world. We also know that the mortality came to an end in the first outbreak soon after ; contemporaries could not have known this would happen - so far as they were concerned everyone might well die.

Some treated each day as if it were their last: We also know that the plague returned regularly, first in and then in the s and s and, as an increasingly urban disease, right through until the Great Plague of in London. But by around it disappeared from England for over two centuries until a number of outbreaks occurred either side of It was not until these modern outbreaks that the bacillus was identified and connection between rats and plague discovered.

Despite all their best efforts people in the historic period had no remedy against the mysterious plague, except as Daniel Defoe put it, to run away from it.

Top Contemporary accounts The sustained onslaught of plague on English population and society over a period of more than years inevitably affected society and the economy. Evidence of the effects can be measured and responses traced not only in social and economic, political and religious terms, but also in changes in art and architecture.

The effects of the Black Death in all these matters were disputed by contemporaries and are still hotly disputed today, which makes the topic so endlessly fascinating. The effects of the Black Death By way of example, Ralph Higden, a contemporary chronicler, argued that 'lords and great men escaped'.

By contrast, Geoffrey le Baker, an Oxfordshire man, noted deaths among the nobility. And so there were: In the Duke of Lancaster, a leading general, was among the victims. Le Baker also noted the immediate effects on the young and strong: In we find references to the outbreak being especially fierce among children.

Later plagues were especially violent, as noted above, in towns. However, there is no doubt that proportionately the hardest-hit part of society was the most numerous: Top Society turned upside down Following the plague we find a clear sense of society turned upside down in England.

The rulers of the kingdom reacted strongly. Some elements of legislation indicate a measure of panic. Within a year of the onset of plague, duringan Ordinance of Labourers was issued and this became the Statute of Labourers in This law sought to prevent labourers from obtaining higher wages.

The Black Death in Europe in the midth Century devastated the population, which was a terrible tragedy. Survivors found themselves in a changed world. Compare and contrast the likely ways in which the lives and attitudes of a peasant and a member of the ruling class would have been different after the plague than if the plague had never happened. The Long-term Impact of the Black Death on the Medieval Agriculture As one of the most severe plagues in human history, the Black Death was unprecedented in two ways: on one hand, it was undoubtedly a terrible nightmare, which swept the entire Europe and killed so many people; however, on the other hand, it was also a unique event that accelerated the process of European agricultural history. THE BLACK DEATHS INFLUENCE ON MEDIEVAL SOCIETY. The Black Death, also known as the Black Plague, or the Bubonic. Plague killed one third of the population of Europe during its reign in the. 13th and 14th centuries. The arrival of this plague set the scene for years.

Despite the shortage in the workforce caused by the plague, workers were ordered to take wages at the levels achieved pre-plague. Landlords gained in the short term from payments on the deaths of their tenants heriotsbut 'rents dwindled, land fell waste for want of tenants who used to cultivate it' Higden and 'King Death: The Black Death and its Aftermath in Late—Medieval England.

Toronto: University of Toronto Press, Poos, Lawrence R. A Rural Society after the Black Death: Essex — Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, Postan, Michael M. The Medieval Economy and Society: An Economic History of Britain in the .

THE BLACK DEATHS INFLUENCE ON MEDIEVAL SOCIETY The Black Death, also known as the Black Plague, or the Bubonic Plague killed one third of the population . Feb 17,  · The long term effects of the Black Death were devastating and far reaching.

Agriculture, religion, economics and even social class were affected. Contemporary accounts shed light on how medieval Britain was irreversibly changed. The Long-term Impact of the Black Death on the Medieval Agriculture As one of the most severe plagues in human history, the Black Death was unprecedented in two ways: on one hand, it was undoubtedly a terrible nightmare, which swept the entire Europe and killed so many people; however, on the other hand, it was also a unique event that accelerated the process of European agricultural history.

Cattle, sheep, crops, everything was left to itself and the Black Death also fell over animals. In addition a high shortage of servants made “normal” farm business difficult. Previously Medieval Europe was overpopulated and the land-owning classes had access to inexpensive manpower.

Separation of Society The plague divided society in the dying and the living. It tore away friends from each other, millers from bakers and parents from their children.

The plague did not care about old or young, rich or poor. The .

The Effect of the Black Death on Medieval Artists and art