Nonprofit sample business plan

If you looked at the life history of several wealthy men that have walked the path of earth, chances are that you may have realized a pattern. What is the pattern, you just may want to know? Well, the pattern has to do with the philanthropic nature in which they lead their lives, as well as the loads of people whom they are able to help along the line.

Nonprofit sample business plan

What is a Business Plan? It Is Used to Plan for a New Venture A business plan is often prepared by for-profits, nonprofits or a government agency when undertaking a new venture, which is: Starting a new organization, product or service or Expanding, acquiring or improving any of the above.

There are numerous benefits of doing a business plan, including: To identify an problems in your plans before you implement those plans. To get the commitment and participation of those who will implement the plans, which leads to better results.

To establish a roadmap to compare results as the venture proceeds from paper to reality. To achieve greater profitability in your organization, products and services -- all with less work. To obtain financing from investors and funders.

To minimize your risk of failure.

nonprofit sample business plan

To update your plans and operations in a changing world. To clarify and synchronize your goals and strategies. For these reasons, the planning process often is as useful as the business plan document itself. However, this can be confusing since a Strategic Plan is conventionally interpreted to be a plan that is focused on the entire organization, including to clarify its purpose and priories and how those priorities will be addressed over a specific time.

Others view the financial information in an overall Strategic Plan to be a business plan. However, this view can be confusing for the same reason as interpretation a Business Plan and Strategic Plan to be the same.

Business Plans vs Strategic Plans Core Contents of a Business Plan Business plans appear in many different formats, depending on its purpose and audience and also the complexity of the venture. However, most business plans address the following five topic areas in one form or another.

Business summary -- Describes the organization, product or service, summarizing its purpose, management, operations, marketing and finances. Market opportunity -- Concisely describes what unmet need it will or does fill, presents evidence that this need is genuine, and that the beneficiaries or a third party will pay for the costs to meet this need.

Describes credible market research on target customers including perceived benefits and willingness to paycompetitors and pricing. People -- Arguably the most important part of the plan, it describes who will be responsible for developing, marketing and operating this venture, and why their backgrounds and skills make them the right people to make this successful.

Ideally, each person in the management team and key program and technical folks are indicated by NAME. Implementation -- This is the how-to section of the plan where the action steps are clearly described, usually in four areas: Marketing builds on market research presented, e.

Financial plan includes, e. A break-even analysis is often included in this section. Contingencies -- This section outlines the most likely things that could go wrong with implementing this plan and how management is prepared to respond to those problems if they emerge.

In many cases, an organization will already have in its possession some of the information needed for preparing a business plan. For example, in the case of nonprofits, grant proposals often contain some of this information.

How to Translate Between For-Profit and Nonprofit Plans For-profit and nonprofit business plans have many similarities, even though the phrase "Business Plan" is usually associated with a for-profit organization. Some of the terms are different, but in most cases, the words in a for-profit Business Plan can be readily translated into words more commonly associated with nonprofits.

For example, "balance sheet" is what nonprofit call a "statement of financial position", "profit and loss statement" or income statement is essentially the same as a "statement of financial activities". Also, the core contents of a Business Plan as listed above are very similar to the core contents of a nonprofit Program Plan because a nonprofit product or service is conventionally referred to as a program.

See Different Names for Similar Concepts. Before you start a major venture, there are several considerations about yourself that you should address.Learn how to write your nonprofit bylaws, Easy step-by-step instructions with free sample bylaws templates to help you get started.

Available as PDF and Word. Nonprofit organizations have a unique set of needs and requirements. That's why these sample business plans for nonprofit organizations and social enterprise businesses can .

A nonprofit plan is the one nonprofit organizations usually follow in order to establish their goals and meet their desired outcomes. In having a nonprofit plan, the organization carefully plans which direction to take, and how much time and resources to allocate in every simple business plan.

The edition of the One Page Business Plan Series has been specifically designed for Non-Profits. If you are responsible for founding or managing a non-profit organization this book was written just for you! Sample business plans from nonprofit organizations with which The Bridgespan Group has worked.

For nonprofit organizations, the business-planning process offers a rare opportunity to step back and look at the organization as a whole. It is a time to connect the dots between mission and programs, to. A non-profit organization has demands and goals quite unlike most regular businesses use Plan ashio-midori.com their uniquely humanitarian outlook, they require a specific set of tools to fit in their non-profit financial statements, their non-profit business plan outlines, etc.

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